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of the u.s. military? we'll get an update from the region and talk with two of the senate's most influencial voices on foreign policy, john mccain and joe lieberman. and healthcare reform one year later. we will ask our sunday group what is the long-term prognosis for the president's signature legislation. all, right now on "fox news sunday." and hello again from fox news in washington. before we talk with our guests, we want to bring you the latest on events in the middle east. in syria, government soldiers have been deployed around the cities that have seen the biggest protests. in yemen, talks for a peaceful transfer of power failed saturday. now, authorities worry about al-qaeda gaining strength in that country. and in libya, bombing by u.s. and allied planes has paveed the way for rebel forces to retake the key oil town. for more on libya let's bring in fox news correspondent steve harrigan in tripoli. >> a rapid advance for the rebels. moving quickly toward what they say is an eventual battle here in tripoli. they have taken the key town of ajdabiya. the air strikes have ta
>>> this sunday, the allied strike against libya stretches into its second week as the u.s. seeks to limit its role. >> responsibility for this operation is being transferred from the united states to our nato allies and partners. >> but as criticism from congress mounts, many questions remain. what happens if gadhafi clings to power? what are the limits of the u.s.'s role if a civil war gets worse? and how does a military campaign relate to our overall strategy in the mideast? this morning, a special joint interview, with us, the secretary of state hillary clinton and secretary of defense robert gates. >>> then -- the president faces critics from both sides of the aisle. did he overstep his constitutional authority by using force without consulting congress. my interview this morning with republican from indiana senator richard lugar. >>> finally, analysis of the administration's handling of the crisis in libya is our fragile economic recovery continues and our military is stretched thin by two other wars, did the president make the case to the american people that libya is worth
plants right here in the united states. >>> and will the u.s. supreme court green light a massive discrimination lawsuit against walmart? arguments today in one of the most important workers' rights cases the court has ever heard. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> moammar gadhafi and his troops are being accused of new carnage and destruction. just hours after president obama tried to explain the u.s. mission in libya to the american people. this hour we have breaking news. we're learning about major, major setbacks for rebel forces in several cities. in misrata, witnesses say government forces are hammering the city hard, firing bullets over civilians' heads and telling them to run for their lives. gadhafi is fighting back with a vengeance against rebels who had regained ground in recent days under the cover of coalition air strikes. >>> and joining us now in ajdabiya is our own arwa damon. you're with the rebels there. how are they doing, arwa? what's the latest? >> reporter: well, wolf, it's been another bitterly disappointing day for the opposition here. th
will explain to those lawmakers and to the american people his take on the u.s. military involve in the the north african nation, which began just over a week ago. white house correspondent mike emanuel is at the national defense university, the site of the speech tonight with a preview. mike? >> reporter: good evening. president obama will speak to a mostly military audience in the auditorium about why he authorized military force in libya. and where the mission goes from here. military intervention by the u.s. and allies appeared to have shifted momentum in favor of the rebels who fought their way to muammar gaddafi's hometown of sirte. >> clearly, the opposition is not well-organized and it's not a very robust organization. that is obvious. so any gain that they make is tenuous based on that. >> reporter: in a town hall on univision simulcast in spanish, president obama reiterated about libya. >> our involvement is there is going to be limited. both in time and in scope. >> reporter: over the weekend, mr. obama explained why he believed military action was necessary. >> i firm
are outgunned and may not be able to take another city. the question before president obama now, should be our u.s. arm the rebels? >> i am not ruling it out or in. >> we will have more from the president in a one-on-one interview with brian williams later in this hour. the air starks' targeted tripoli tonight. 22 tomahawk missiles. the largest air assault in recent days. the defense department says the price tag for u.s. taxpayers so far is about $550 million. that is expected to run about $40 million more over the next three weeks. hillary clinton today called this a turning point in libya when she was in london. she met with one of the rebel leaders. what are you seeing on the ground in libya? >> i still can't get over that number, $550 million to destroy tanks from the air. i don't understand how the price tag gets so high so quickly. it could look like a turning point on the ground, but for gaddafi's forces, he is crushing the rebellion. horrible reports emerging. here in the east, his troops began a counteroffensive, erasing many of the gains they had accomplished. >> at times today the rebe
that it will be brief. he will be speaking from the u.s. army right here in the nation's cap tell and speaking to a country that has mixed feelings about the third military intervention in the past decade and not to convince that this mission has a clear goal or exit strategy. the commander in chief will be speaking about how long and decision to intervening here and the united states and violence against demonstrators in bahrain, syria, another hot spot in the middle east. wolf blitzer will rejoin us before and after the president's big address, including anderson cooper as well as reports from inside experience team and great experience team of analysts. let's begin on the ground in libya. we'll check out the map. one clear result if you take a close look at the air strikes and remove here, i want to go back to march 18th. the day before the strikes began, the day before, you can see right here in red, these were towns just before, just before the strikes began. controlled red meaning controlled by the regime. look where we are today. controlled green. that is controlled by the opposition. t
the american people tonight to explain the u.s. mission in libya. the reasoning behind it. the u.s. military's role, and are we go from here. all this comes on the heels of a significant, rather, a dramatic victory for the administration with nato agreeing yesterday to take command of the mission including the ground attack. that as international airstrikes continue for the 9th night over the nation. libya state tv broadcast these images from a southern city of sabha claiming the attacks were against civilians. top nato commander today hitting back against suggestions that nato forces are essentially providing air cover for the rebels. >> our goal, our goal, it is to help protect civilians and population centers from attack or that are the threat of an attack. >>shepard: the in six not to take sides but we have. the opposition is benefiting, before the no-fly zone they were in trouble but this has weakened the military. and now the two sides are fighting on equal terms because of us and they are closing in on muammar qaddafi's hometown, a key government stronghold on the road to tripoli. and
week." u.s. and allied bombs and missiles hammer libyan targets. the rebels gain ground. and the president prepares to make his pitch to the american people. >> it's u.s. policy that gadhafi needs to go. >> what if gadhafi stays? just back from the middle east, robert gates and hillary clinton come to "this week" for their first interviews since the attacks began to make the president's case. what does victory look like? kit be achieved? at what cost? >>> then -- >> i don't have any regrets at all. >> what would donald rumsfeld do in a third war. and he'll respond to critics who say he's been rewriting history. >>> and george will and the "roundtable" will talk to us. why is one hopeful having a tough time agreeing with himself. >> announcer: live from the newseum. >>> some major developments in libya. rebel forces have scored a key victory taking back the oil town of brega in theest. they continue the push west. abc's alex marquardt is in benghazi. what is the mood there? >> reporter: a lot of gun fire and horn honking. a quick advance toward the west was expected follo
of the union with candy crowley" starts right now. >>> why in the world is the u.s. military involved in libya? republicans are the toughest critics. there are echos inside the democratic party. >> i really don't believe that we have an obligation to get involved in every single occurrence in that part of the world. >> the immediate thing congress needs to do when it returns is to cut off any funds for containing libya. >> in a statement senator j. rockefeller wrote of serious concerns. our military and budget are stretched thin fighting two wars already. and i want to avoid getting into another conflict with unknown cost and consequences. tomorrow night, the president addresses the nation. today, a muddled mission against gadhafi. we talked to armed services carl levin and chaos throughout the mideast with former national security adviser stephen hadley and the former head of the cia, general michael hayden. and then assessing growing concern over japan's nuclear disaster with nuclear analyst joseph sorincioni and the impact on this with economist alice rivlin and douglas holtz aiken. i'm can
can call the obama doctrine, when to deploy u.s. military forces around the world. he laid out the case when it's in the united states interest to use military force, when it's in the united states interest not to use military force, and this is the example that he gave, this is going to be the precedent, what the united states has done now in libya, presumably given the explosion of unrest that's happening right now throughout north africa and the middle east, if there are similar circumstances that develop in other countries, whether in syria, or yemen and bahrain, and the potential of mass slaughter of civilians is there, the pressure will be on this president to go ahead and authorize what the president authorized in libya. and the greatest potential for the u.s., if there's a revolution, and if there's serious unrest in iran and the people are standing up against mahmoud ahmadinejad and the i ayatollahs take similar action as far as iran is concerned. i think we can call this the obama doctrine. >> and he also made it clear what the limits of this mission is as he sees it
patrolling off libya's coast, this as the u.s. gets ready to hand over control of the no fly zone to the alliance. whatever that alliance is. we don't know at this time. in the meantime pro car davi forces ratchet up attacks in an eastern city of that country, stopping rebel groups there, but the international air strikes continue and now we have reports that those attacks forced pro qaddafi forces to withdraw tanks from another rebel-held city in the west. a whole lot goes on there today, jon. jon: the libyan leader remains as defiant as ever, appearing from his compound in tripoli and vowing to win the historic battle. now there's word, though, that mommar qaddafi may be planning his exit strategy. secretary of state hillary clinton, weighing in on that on abc's "world news with diane sawyer". >> this is what we hear from so many sources, diane, it is a constanto. >> today? >> today, yesterday, the day before. some of it, i'll be very, you know -- it's my personal opinion -- some of it is theater. a lot of it is just the way he bee haves. it's somewhat unpredictable. but some of
. scuba diving. bill: not new jersey. martha: they are getting out of the u.s., not new jersey. we'll be right back tomorrow, same time same place, see you then. jon: right now breaking developments and brand-new stories this hour. the attack on libya. a ferocious era salt to enforce the no-fly zone and qaddafi's compound among the targets. smoke rises from two damaged reactors. radiation detected in the count three's food and water supply. the 9/11 trials at guantanamo bay, what the lawyers that are set to try the cases are selling faction. how they believe the obama administration may be working to keep these cases out of gitmo. all new, all live "happening now." and good morning to you i'm jon scott. jenna: i'm jenna lee. we're so glad you are with us. we are here in the fox newsroom. happening right now we have a fox news alert out of libya. the u.s. navy releasing grand new video of the punishing nighttime assaults on qaddafi forces. they are using b.-2 stealth bombers, jet fighters and tom hawk missiles. jon: qaddhafi's forces come under fire across the count three. the secur
and former u.s. ambassador bolten why the arab nations should be be paying for this. and n.a.t.o. leaders missing in action and john hunt, sr., and alan simpson why he he may have to go begging to china for dough. or we will, and that's not good. and the company behind all of those f-16's, former lockheed martin ceo says that air power alone will not win this thing. first, the very latest headlines for you, rebel leadners libya now say the strategic eastern oil town of ebadia is now 100% in the hands of rebel forces and destroying an artillery battery and armored vehicles and the president in a warm-up to the big libyan speech planned for monday night, saying today, countless eyes and destroying gaddafi's air defenses and the president saying that we're succeeding in our mission and democrats and republicans unclear what the mission is. and protests continuing in syria and thousands demonstrates near damascus at the same time and the human rights group reporting 70 political prisoners and stocks in saudi arabia, more than 2% today. that's right, the market was over there. one the view on
, hezbollah bullah. it is also a font for regional instability. both in iraq and against u.s. forces there quite frankly syria matters a lot. and libya doesn't matter quite as much, nearly as much. >> shepard: unlike syria, has no plans for actions in syria. in fact, there is a different leader in syria now. many of the members in congress of both parties who have gone to syria in recent months have said they believe he's a reformer "the fox report" chontd jonathan hunt in our newsroom. assaad a reformer? >> there are many syrians, many middle east experts and many on capitol hill who would laugh at the very idea of president assaad as a reformer. among those, senator jon kyl, the republican whip who said in a statement today and i quote, how many more syrians must president assaad murder or assault before secretary of state clinton no longer endorses the notion that is he a reformer. of course, secretary clinton was actually referring to the view of members of congress, not her own personal view. president assaad is probably better thought of as a northern nicener an economic sense.
warren christopher. there is the subject of diplomacy. the u.s. is now engaged in three wars in three different muslim countries. the issue of diplomacy has never been more critical, it seems. we are glad you are joining us, including a look back at our interview with warren christopher, right now. >> all i know is his name is james, and he needs extra help with his reading. >> i am james. >> yes. >> to everyone making a difference -- >> thank you. >> you help us all live better. >> nationwide insurance supports tavis smiley. with every question and every answer, nationwide insurance is proud to join tavis in working to improve financial literacy and remove obstacles to economic empowerment, one conversation at a time. nationwide is on your side. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. kcet public television] tavis: a few programming notes. tomorrow night on the program, we will take a look at the relief and recovery operations in japan with architect hitoshi abe and a conversation with known play right eve ensler. later this week, a co-founder of
a weekend of punishing allied air attacks in libya. according to u.s. officials, coalition strikes have successfully crippled gadhafi's air defenses and a no-fly zone is effectively in place over the country. although gadhafi himself is not a target of what is being called operation odyssey dawn, one of the strikes caused extensive damage to the libyan leader's tripoli compound last night. at this hour, gadhafi's whereabouts remain unknown. he has vowed to fight a long, drawn out war with western forces. making the rounds on the sunday talk shows, admiral mike mullen stressed that the u.s. role in libya would be limited but he did not give an exact date of how long the u.s. would remain involved. >> there's no one that understands better than i that the stress and the strain that we've been under for a long time in our tenth year of war, both in iraq and in afghanistan. that said, we are within our capability and capacity to be able to execute this mission. the directions have been given to me, it is limited. it is very focused and in that regard, we're more than able, as has been shown
at a major u.s. airport, the very same one where an air traffic controller fell asleep on the job. the close call this time around. >> and she said mexican pirates killed her husband while they were jet skiing on a border lake between texas and mexico. now six months later his body hasn't been found, no one has been arrested. the latest on the investigation, plus what she is vowing to do. it's all new, it's all live, it's "happening now". >>> hi everybody. we have a whole lot of ground to cough today. we're so glad you're with us. i'm jenna lee. jon: we do indeed. i'm jon scott. "happening now", nato takes charge of air operations in libya as the fighting intensifies in one strategic oil town. those are antiqaddafi rebels, giving it all they've got, trying to retake control of brega as they come under rocket fire from pro qaddafi forces, the opposition getting hit hard in other parts of the cup as well. jenna: the u.s. considering a plan to arm the rebels, even though nato's chief is opposed to the idea. right now the cia has operatives on the ground in libya. jon: meantime a sign that qadda
is recinding his offer to step down by year's end. this as opposition to his regime testifies. they are a key u.s. ally in the fight against al-qaida warns his country is a ticking time bomb that could spiral into civil war without him. a deadly bullet blast killed more than a hundred people. today security forces reportedly fired teargas on some 4,000 demonstrators. in a bid to ease the crisis syrian's president is expected to lift the nearly 50-year state of emergency and move to lift restrictions on civil liberties. the country's emergency laws that gave police almost unlimited power to arrest without arpblgs will be lifted prior to the elections in september. this comes as the interim military rulers says hosni mubarak is under house arrest in egypt. this half he went for medical treatment. gregg: it has been ten days since the military mission began, and the president expected to tell the nation the mission is justified. white house correspondent mike emanuel live in washington with more on that. what else do we know about the case that president obama is going to make tonight? >> reporter:
made the case on u.s. involvement in libya, the military is preparing to scale back the role and let nato take command. at the same time, members from 40 nations gather in london to discuss the end game in libya and a possible future without muammar qaddafi. at home nato allied supreme commander in europe, is telling congress he is optimistic muammar qaddafi will fall under the pressure. >> we have a chance at muammar qaddafi leaving because the entire international community is again him. >>shepard: muammar qaddafi ruled for four decades and repeatedly said he will never give up and despite international strikes against his military, the rebels say the government is better armed and organization than anything makeshift they come up with. there are muammar qaddafi's government tanks and rockets driving back the open opposition. though are trying to retreat, the relatives from a town. >> regular cars are fighting with machine guns, et cetera, et cetera, we did not have arms or we would finish muammar qaddafi in a few days. >>shepard: a spokesman for the opposition in london asking the
.com click on the you decide link today. we're asking if the u.s. should arm libya's rebels. there are some questions about that. click on your answer and you can see how other people are voting. so far more than a thouf you have weighed in. you can check it out at foxnews.com. so many tkpwres, about who the opposition is. gregg: the president didn't talk about arming the rebels but a lot of people are saying he really should have done that. we want your thoughts on that. in the meantime there is a new wave of protests in yemen this morning. take a look at this demonstrators calling for the immediate ouster of ali abdullah saleh and demanding political reforms. now ali abdullah saleh has promised to september down at the end of his term, dozens of protesters have been killed in yemen since antigovernment violent tkepl straeugtss broke out last month. and now syria where president's has resigned, they just quit. human rights groups claiming that dozen of antigovernment protesters were killed by the syrian troops. hundreds of house of progovernment demonstrators are flooding the streets of da
for the u.s., the intel community, works very hard to provide the administration, whatever administration is, with the best information possible and available at that moment. whoever has the best information likely is going to make the best decisions in the best interest of the u.s., which is not to engage in war overseas. there is a tendency to think that is what we're doing, that are warmongers. the real world is, unfortunately, more difficult. i would argue that thegency, you know, is a tool used by any administration to enhance transparency, to minimize the risk that people face overseas, that the government faces overseas. then again people will be watching this. ey will think hey that mike baker is pretty subjective. hostmimike baker a >> president obama is speaking about libya later today from national defense university. ahead of the speech, the associated press wrote that the white house made it clear that it was not a precedent for involvement in other nations that hold strategic interests for the u.s.. we will have the president's speech live at 7:30 eastern and we will take your
is a highly developed country. it is as technologically sophisticated as us, and there's much concern in the u.s. that a similar accident can occur here. how do you respond to that concern? >> well, first, i would agree with you. the reactor in chernobyl was of a different design. it was-- it had point of instability. it had no containment vessel. but we are looking very carefully at what is naepg japan because, as you say, they're using more advanced designs. a number of reactors in the united states have similar designs, and we're going to look at what went wrong in terms of the double-barreled whammy this huge, hung earthquake and huge su, and look to our reactors again and learn as much as we can so we can, if needed, improve the safety. by "if needed" what i really mean is we're always increasing the safety of our reactors, and not only our reactors but the safety of all our industrial systems. >> mr. secretary, two days ago a number of us wrote to chairman upton, whitfield, and stearns, asking our committee here investigate and hold hearings about the safety and prepared understandness of
american fighters jets are active at the moment, u.s. pilots flew 113 of the 175 coalition air sorties yesterday, for example, that u.s. role will shrink dramatically in the next few days leaving others to decide on military targeting. on the ground all public signals from the regime suggest continued defiance and continued attacks on the opposition. but here's the intriguing nugget. senior u.s. officials tell cnn tonight that some members of gadhafi's inner circle are reaching out to the state department and reaching out to other arab nations, as well. curious contacts to say the least but as yet our sources tell us no indication gadhafi himself is looking to negotiate an exit strategy. >> i think there are any number of possible outcomes here, and no one is in a position to predict them. whether they're -- whether there are major further defections or divisions within his family, there are a variety of possibilities that seems to me. >> a variety of possibilities but listen here, secretary gates isn't betting on a peaceful settlement. >> gadhafi has basically sworn that he will show
denouncing their president hosni mubarak. egypt is a major beneficiary of u.s. foreign aid. the u.s. was in the awkward position of supporting the pro-democracy demonstrators without alienating a longtime ally. after weeks of bloody confrontations in tahrir square, longtime president mubarak stepped down. now to libya. click on it, and gives you the latest developments and everything you need to know. libya has become the focal point of this historic movement. rebels dwept into dozens of key cities until moammar gadhafi unleashed military forces on his own people and that prompted nato to get involved with strategic air strikes. this fever has now spread to syria. again, all of the information on cnn.com. bahrain, of course, on the map here and also in yemen as well. anything can happen. john? >> and truly important questions coming out of this, what's going to happen next and why is this happening? mohammed jamjoon is live in abu dab toe answer some of these questions. let's start with syria. it appears the arab awakening is there. president assad is facing a tough choice with viol
in the price of crude equals to a $40 billion withdrawal of funds from the u.s. economy. that's just america's stats of the take that around the world and see how bad it is to have crude go higher. this is a serious problem. we need to stop crude from going higher and certainly pulling the speculators from the market is a way to slow down the price movement because if you do not have reason to take delivery, you would not just be buying for a pure speculator to make money. >>neil: but you physically have to have the oil. interesting. thank you very much. >>guest: thank you for having me. >>neil: coalition forces flying 175 anythings over libya but they will not get him from the united arab emirates refusing to join blaming the decision on "u.s. policies toward bahrain," which is facing its own revolt. and our guest says if they will not get involved, why are we? the former head of the c.i.a. osama bin laden unit, and i don't buy their reason. how bahrain is an excuse, that strikes me as them getting cold feet on looking like they are participating in an arab crackdown. >>guest: i think it is
to he reclaim ground they had lost. >> that said, secretary gates, would the u.s. supply arms to the rebels? >> no decision has been made about that at this point. the security council resolution would permit it, the second resolution, 1973, would permit it. but no decisions have been made by our government about that. >> but does this administration want to see the rebels prevail and overtake gadhafi? >> i think the president's policy is that it's time for gadhafi to go. that's not part of our military mission, which has been very limited and very strictly defined. >> how is that going to happen? secretary clinton you said this week you thought you were picking up signals that he wanted to get out of his own accord. >> well, there are many different aspects to the strategy that the international community is pursuing. as bob has said, the military mission has gone very well. it only started just eight days ago so it has been remarkably well coordinated and focused and now nato will take command and control over it. at the same time, we are pursuing really strict economic sanc
then become the largest class action employment suit in u.s. history. walmart, america's largest private employer, says, no, the class would be too big, the plaintiffs too dissimilar, the issues too many to litigate. the plaintiffs say walmart wants a big company exception to civil rights 0 law. two lower federal courts have ruled the class and case can go forward. that brings us to the supreme court where we now have three women justices, the most ever. cnn's kate bolduan has been following the case for us and joins us to recap the arguments. kate, good to see you. any sign that the women justices were at all receptive to the plaintiffs? >> reporter: that's very interesting. i would say, first off, that it did seem in the courtroom with the aggressive question you did hear from the female justices, that they were receptive to the women's claims to the sides of the plaintiffs. but, as i just said, there are three women on this court. so what it's looking like -- we always have to give it a huge caveat here because of course we never know until the justices rule -- from the commentary and
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 137 (some duplicates have been removed)